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Why Men Are 3 Times More Likely to Commit Suicide Than Women

by | May 1, 2022 | Issue 145, Issues, Mental Health | 0 comments

Suicide is a subject that puzzles many of us, motivates researchers and directs the development of many medical strategies and treatments. The motives behind such behavior are not usually visible,...
Why Men Are 3 Times More Likely to Commit Suicide Than Women

Suicide is a subject that puzzles many of us, motivates researchers and directs the development of many medical strategies and treatments. The motives behind such behavior are not usually visible, or they might even seem incomprehensible to those left behind. Suicide rates vary according to age and gender: women attempt suicide three times more than men, yet men end their lives three times more than women.

 

Why Do Men Commit Suicide?

A person with a mental illness usually hides from friends and loved ones as they are afraid of being judged. They face people like a normal, happy person most of the time. However, when that person is alone, depression and suicidal thoughts take over.

Suicide remains a significant public health problem worldwide, with 1 million estimated deaths per year and 10-20 million people attempting it worldwide. 25% of these attempts pertain to young adults between 20 and 24 years old. Suicide is among the three leading causes of death for this age group, along with traffic accidents and homicide.

 

Why Is the Male Suicide Rate Several Times Higher Than the Female?

The reasons why there has been such an imbalance between genders can be surprising. One theory correlates suicide attempts with how often men resort to professional psychiatric help. Another theory focuses on alcohol and substance abuse as relief for troubling events in an individual’s life.

Whatever the reasons, the suicide rate for men is a severe problem. The best way to reduce the number of suicides is to increase awareness of the issue and provide resources for men struggling with mental health problems. Suicide is preventable, and we need to do everything we can to help save lives.

 

Why Are Men Reluctant to Ask for Help?

There are several reasons why men may be reluctant to ask for help, but the most common is that they don’t want to be seen as weak. Men are often taught that they should be strong and independent from a young age and that asking for help is a sign of weakness. As a result, some men feel ashamed or embarrassed to admit that they need help and often try to deal with their problems on their own.

Men are also reluctant to ask for help because they don’t know how to ask for it. Many men are raised in households where emotions aren’t discussed openly, and as a result, they may not feel comfortable talking about their feelings with other people. This can make it difficult to ask for help when they need it.

Finally, some men are reluctant to ask for help because of a lack of trust. This situation is widespread among men who have been victims of abuse or violence or who have had a negative experience with mental health services in the past. As a result, men feel that they are better off dealing with their problems on their own and that asking for help is not worth the risk.

Regardless of why men are reluctant to ask for help, it’s important to remember that seeking assistance is not a sign of weakness. Admitting that you need help is often the first step towards getting better. If you’re struggling with mental health issues, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Many people can provide you with support and guidance, and there is no shame in admitting that you need help. You are not alone.

 

A Parting Reminder

We should always be concerned for each other’s well-being, especially regarding mental health issues. The best we can do is educate ourselves about mental health issues and help people suffering from them. If you suspect that someone is going through a difficult time, you could always talk to them, convince them to see a specialist and help them out while going through a tough time. Sometimes, all you need to do to save a life is ask.

If you are in crisis, call the toll-free National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Drew B
Drew B