Kian Karimi Spotlight

Kian Karimi Spotlight

"When I first saw my first rhinoplasty procedure, I was so intrigued by the complexity… all of the emotional and psychological things that went along with it. And I, at that point, realized that facial plastic surgery is the perfect harmony of science and art, and I...

The Next Pandemic: What You Need to Know about Rising Mental Health Concerns (Part 2)

by | Mar 27, 2020 | Issue 114, Legal, Lifestyle, Mental health, Pediatrics | 0 comments

Know Your Referrals

Clients who were not previously in economic distress may now be out of work and need to be guided to resources to help cover basic needs. Despite the unemployment rate falling to 13.3 percent and 2.5 million jobs being added in May, being aware of opportunities and resources for your clients can be an essential step in their recovery. (Bayly, 2020) Couples who were often arguing before coronavirus may now have entered into the territory of physical abuse. You need to assess for and know domestic violence protocols, social service resources, and information for COVID testing centers near you.

Telehealth Platforms

Telehealth platforms like Zoom, Skype, Facetime, or Microsoft Teams have provided a beacon of hope for many in these challenging times. If you have not moved to provide services through telehealth, now might be the time. HIPAA relaxed regulations to allow providers and clients to reach each other by more accessible means. Even when the HIPAA regulations return to normal, the need for telehealth options won’t expire. Individuals who are considered high-risk will most likely need to continue physical distancing for an undetermined amount of time, and the risk of any “second wave” could also extend the need for virtual appointments.

Increase Multicultural Sensitivity and Competencies

The COVID-19 pandemic knows no boundary lines, whether it be by country or ethnicity. According to a report from the American Psychological Association, “people of color are more likely than white adults to report significant stressors in their life as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, namely getting coronavirus (71% vs. 59%, respectively), basic needs (61% vs. 47%), and access to health care services (59% vs. 46%)”(Bethune, 2020). The report also revealed that “slightly more than 2 in 5 Hispanic adults (41%) say their average level of stress related to the coronavirus pandemic during the past month was between 8 and10.Hispanic adults are also most likely to say they regularly or often feel stress as a result of the pandemic (37%), as compared with white (32%), black (32%), Native American (31%), and Asian (28%) adults”(Bethune, 2020).

Consider Special Populations

A 2016 New York Times article shared that “loneliness can accelerate cognitive decline in older adults, and isolated individuals are twice as likely to die prematurely as those with more robust social interactions. These effects start early: Socially isolated children have signifi-cantly poorer health 20 years later, even after controlling for other factors” (Khullar, 2016). With every state implementing a stay at home order, and nursing homes being locked down, time will only tell the lasting impact. Another important aspect to note, there has beenan increased number of minors who have contacted the National Sexual Assault Hotline. According to RAINN, the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network, “at the end of March, with much of the country under lockdown, there was a 22% increase in monthly calls from people younger than 18, and half of all incom-ing contacts were from minors” (Kamenetz, 2020).
As we join together to fight the unseen enemy of COVID-19 and its effects on the mental health crisis in America, we must be diligent and proactive in our efforts to bring healing to others. It starts by taking care of yourselves and stepping up to address the mental health issues around us. Lives are depending on it.

References

Facts & Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Facts & Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics
Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19. (2020, June 12). Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/ daily-life-coping/managing-stress-anxiety.html Keeter, S. (2020, March 30). People financially affected by the coronavirus outbreak are experiencing more psychological distress than others. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https:// www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/03/30/ people-financially-affected-by-COVID-19-out-break-are-experiencing-more-psychological-distress-than-others/
Keeter, S. (2020, March 30). People financially affected by the coronavirus outbreak are experiencing more psychological distress than others. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https:// www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/03/30/ people-financially-affected-by-COVID-19-out-break-are-experiencing-more-psychological-distress-than-others/
Wan, W. (2020, May 04). The coronavirus pandemic is pushing America into a mental health crisis. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/ health/2020/05/04/mental-health-coronavirus/
Bayly, L. (2020, June 05). The unemployment rate falls to 13.3 percent as the economy gains surprise 2.5 million jobs despite coronavirus. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.nbcnews. com/business/business-news/unemployment-rate-falls-13-3-percent-economy-gains-surprise-2-n1223236
Bethune, S. (2020). APA Stress in America™ Report: High Stress Related to Coronavirus is the New Normal for Many Parents. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.apa.org/news/ press/releases/2020/05/stress-America-COVID-19
Facts & Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics
Kamenetz, A. (2020, April 28). Child Sexual Abuse Reports Are On The Rise Amid Lockdown Orders. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/04/28/847251985/child-sexual-abuse-reports-are-on-the-rise-amid-lock-down-orders
Khullar, D. (2016, December 22). How Social Isolation Is Killing Us. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/22/up-shot/how-social-isolation-is-killing-us.html
Koskie, B. (1993, April 07). Depression: Facts, Statistics, and You. Retrieved June 26, 2020, from https://www.healthline.com/health/de-pression/facts-statistics-infographic

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